sue watling

language

April 5, 2009 | 1 Comment

I’ve been reading an account of the life of the Russian psychologist Vygotsky, written by his daughter, in 1994. Gita describes how her father worked with physically handicapped and mentally retarded children, how he founded a laboratory to study the psychology of abnormal children and how the laboratory was upgraded to be the Experimental Institute of Defectology. In a sad sentence, Gita writes:

“Vygotsky was always able to establish an atmosphere of trust and rapport with the children, he always talked with them as though they were equals, always paid attention to their answers. In turn, the children opened up to him in a way they never did with other examiners.”

Vygotsky was 37 when he died of TB in 1934. Gita wrote her account in 1994 with no apparent self-consciousness about using language that would be considered inappropriate in this country but still reflects social and cultural attitudes in Russia today. Language is key; if we were to substitute disability for difference and accessible for inclusive, we might have more success in changing attitudes.



1 Comment so far

  1.    Unn West on May 4, 2009 5:40 am      

    Your blog note came up as I was Googling Vygotsky’s daughter. Like you, I’m supposed to be doing an assignment.. (Or is Paper one peg above?). It is sadly fascinating how such a brilliant pedagogue as Vygotsky died in his thirties, and here we are, still using his ideas. Carpe Diem!

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